Democracy Lessons from a Minority PM

Syria_bombing_2018

Democracy Lessons from a minority Prime Minister:

Lesson #1:  Syria cannot bomb Syria; only US, France and UK can.

Lesson #2:  Assad need to go because he is not a democrat.

Lesson #3:  Theresa May do not need any one’s approval to bomb Syria, because she runs a minority government supported by DUP 😳🤐

[Picture taken from https://www.facebook.com/thedeepleft/ ]

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Why do our leaders fail to learn from past mistakes?

Syria_attack

It was only a couple of days ago in BBC Newsnight the Conservative MP & Chair of the Defence Committee Julian Lewis and Labour peer Lord Falconer very clearly advised NOT to bomb Syria.

Julian Lewis also stated that the opposition whom US, UK and France try to side with are “overwhelmingly led by Jihadists”.

If you missed the program, I urge you to watch it; here is the link.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09zbf11/newsnight-10042018

 

Current situation in Syria is horrific and extremely alarming.

Chemical, or for that matter ANY attack, on civilians and children are unpardonable.

The culprits should be tried in court of law and punished.

Though not proven, world leaders indicate Assad is the prime culprit.

Even if the chemical attack was carried out by Assad, does that horrific act give permission for USA, UK and France to attack Syria?

Then what?  What next, after bombing?

Western powers to come out and leave Syria to anarchy and to the will of the extremists?

 

It is very clear that public in UK do not want to attack another country.

UK’s parliament too indicate the same mood.

May knows that she will not get enough votes in parliament to attach Syria.

Yet, this minority government’s confused Prime Minister appears to side with a war-mongering US President.

Trump, Macron and May are making the same mistake by Bush, Blair, Sarkozy and Cameron.

Why do our leaders fail to learn from past mistakes?

 

There is no doubt that Assad is not innocent.

There is no doubt that things are not pretty in Syria.

But issues like Assad and chemical weapons cannot be resolved by bombing an already war-torn  country.

Instead, the UN and rest of the world should put pressure on Syria – and on Russia who supports them.

Only a strong political process could resolve the issues like Syria.

Anti-Semitism, Lord Sugar and Current Reality

Labour_antisemitism

One need to salute the ingenuity of some of our lords and “leaders”!

They have more expertise in deceiving audience, compared to experienced magicians.

Need proof?

Just look at the excitement on Corbyn’s Facebook post.

A post, which was posted in 2012!

It was intended as a general comment about removal of public art on the grounds of freedom of speech.

Later Corbyn clarified it as well:

“I sincerely regret that I did not look more closely at the image I was commenting on, the contents of which are deeply disturbing and anti-Semitic.”

The matter should have closed by this statement.

But of course, our “magicians” are experts!

By this tweet, Lord Sugar too proved he is not behind anyone.

Labour and anti-Semitism

Like in any large party, unfortunately there could be few racists in Labour as well.

The party launched inquiry chaired by Shami Chakrabarty; it’s report is being implemented.

Two senior Labour figures were suspended too.

While these are the facts, current attacks on Labour are nothing but cheap tactics.

Cheap tactics, by Tory supporting media and a small section of “old” Labour supporters.

They are afraid of the growing popularity of the true Labour and it’s strong, left leadership.

A leadership which condemned the Iraq war.

A leadership which firmly stands against inequality.

A leadership which has taken the right stand on Brexit.

The Tories, “old” Labour and some of its MPs know their days are gone.

They are desperate.

So desperate, that they’re whining over a Facebook post from 2012.

To discuss more about this topic is just to deceive and divert public’s attention away from current government and its pathetic “achievements”.

Here are some of those “achievements”:

Just three “achievements” from just last few days and weeks.

They summarises the incompetency of May’s minority government.

It is this incompetency that Lord Sugar, Tory media and others are trying to divert our attention from.

Let us not fall in to their diversion tactics.

Coming back to anti-Semitism.

The world stood firmly behind Jewish community during Nazi brutalities.

The world should show same support for Palestinians, who are oppressed for decades.

Labour was clear in their 2017 manifesto:

“A Labour government will immediately recognise the state of Palestine”.

That statement is very clear.

Being pro-Palestine is in no way anti-Semitic.

Salisbury attack and the questions it raises…

Salisbury Attack

What happened in Salisbury should be treated as a terrorist act.

Per news, the culprits used military grade nerve agents.

They not only caused serious harm to the direct victims, but also threatened lives of many others.

Whoever orchestrated the attack should face tough consequences for their actions.

 

The question is – do we know who is responsible?

Do we have foolproof evidence that can be used in a court – national or international – to prosecute the offenders?

 

Not so long ago, a PM took us to war against Iraq.

Later, we found that the reasoning given were untrue.

 

Expelling 23 diplomats is not more serious than going to war.

But do we have proof?

 

There are other important questions as well.

Why is it so easy for someone to bring in military grade chemical weapons to the streets of the UK?

What more can our intelligence services do, to prevent similar attacks in future?

Why is it difficult to confiscate the millions of foreign-mafia investments in the capital, if we have clear evidences?

 

As of now, these questions have no answers.

We need to gather evidences – solid evidences that clearly point to the culprits of this heinous act at Salisbury.

 

Once available, we have the power to take actions.

Appropriate, tough actions; much more than expelling diplomats.

Till then, we only have assumptions.

I sincerely hope our intelligence will bring in all required evidence to prosecute the criminals.

Let us wait for that to happen.

One cannot kill an idea….

Bhagat Singh

One can hang Shaheed Bhagat Singh.

One can topple Lenin’s statue.

But just remember, one cannot kill an idea.

“It is easy to kill individuals but you cannot kill the ideas. Great empires crumbled, while the ideas survived” – Shaheed Bhagat Singh.

To rest of the political parties in India, just remember the poem by Pastor Martin Niemöller

Labour’s Brexit Position

BREXIT_Labour

I voted Leave.

I support Labour.

I also agree with Labour’s new Brexit approach.

From what I read and understood, it is a sensible way to move forward.

Why I like it?

1.     It is clear and well-drafted.

2.     While it allows UK to have its sovereignty, it also ensures the working people and industries are taken care of.

3.     It is conditionalUK will stay in Customs Union only if we has a say in EU trade deals.

4.     It does not blindly go behind the Leave for Leave’s sake – which is what May has desperately proposed; worried by the Leave win.  PM’s is a pity attempt with main focus to keep the Tory votes together.  It does not solve a problem called Brexit.

As I mentioned earlier, a sensible way forward.

Waiting for more details to emerge from Corbyn’s office – for a sensible, positive approach to Brexit – which the UK voted for.

 

Padmaavat – why the controversy?

Padmaavat

I watched Padmaavat yesterday.

Nice direction, great camera & lighting and fantastic action by Ranveer Singh. Deepika and Shahid Kapoor too did not disappoint.

At no scene, the Rajput dynasty and its subjects were shown in a bad light; instead the movie reinforces the courage, might, values and wealth of Rajputs.

It also clearly portrayed the vicious, cruel, and deceiving nature of Alauddin Khilji. Other than Khilji’s queen, I couldn’t see a single person on Khilji side shown in a positive light.

So what is Karni sena protesting for? In what way the history is distorted in this movie – even though the movie makers never claim it to be an factual representation of history?

I too in school days have read and heard about the Muslim emperor who was fascinated by the Rajput queen after seeing her reflection in a mirror.

Bansali being Bansali, and Ranveer being a bit overacting hero, this obsession became a prominent part of the movie. I also felt the movie ended a bit abruptly. Other than these two glitches, I enjoyed the movie.

I do not agree with rituals similar to Jauhar or Sati.

That said, to give benefit of doubt to Bansali, the movie did show the Rajput women unsuccessfully attempting to stop the enemy by throwing fire.

After several months (Diwali to Holi and more) of blockade, war and the men using all available weapons to fight the Khilji’s might army, I can empathize with the decision of the Rajput women to self-immolise themselves.

It should not have happened, and again, I am not supporting Jauhar, but Jauhar might have been the last resort for the women of a proud dynasty of a long gone era – to not allow their enemies to touch them, or even see them, even after they are dead.

To those who are against Padmaavat: please watch the movie once; you might re-consider your criticisms.

Passive Spectator or Active Participant?

I generally don’t share star views, but here’s one from Randeep Hooda for the day.

While I like the good part of this tweet, feels a bit uneasy to accept it in its entirety.

Should we just look away from “youth on drugs”?

Should we stay away, while people are being marginalized due to their faiths or believes?

Instead of being a passive spectator, we should actively discuss the current topics and happenings with friends and people around us.

Instead of stop watching news, we should demand for truth and facts; we should hold media accountable for what they broadcast.

What do you think?

Pune Violence – is it an isolated incident?

Mumbai_violence

I am far away from the happenings at Pune and Mumbai in last few days.

Per available news, the Dalit organisation’s event to mark the 200th anniversary of Bhima Koregaon battle in Pune district was disturbed by Hindu-extreme-right wings.

Stone-pelting and violence followed; someone died.

In protest, the Dalit organisations declared Maharasthra-wide bandh, which again was marred by violence.

I do not agree with any violence – whether it is done against people or properties, anywhere in India.

 

At first look, the bandh day protests and violence appears to be a retaliation to the latest violence against Dalits.

But, in my opinion, it goes deeper than that.

To me, it is a retaliation by India’s oppressed, against the continuous happenings for past several years, instigated by extreme elements in wider Sangh parivar.

 

The demolition of Babari Masjid by Sangh parivar alienated and scared the Muslim minorities in India.

Modi’s ban on cattle slaughter has virtually stopped the leather industry, traditionally operated by Dalits and other minority castes.  Illiteracy, poverty and ban on raw materials have pushed them to a corner.

On top, numerous mob killings similar to those at Bisara, Alwar and violence similar to Una flogging worsened the crisis.

It went even further; the Una accused projected the Dalits as Muslims.

Another example why the minority Dalits and Muslims might feel they’re jointly targeted.

These organised attacks by Sangh Parivar were not limited only to Dalits and Muslims.

They even went against students who were protesting in campuses.

The courts could not prove any evidence against JNU students; in fact, police have not even filed a chargesheet against the students.

On the contrary, forensic tests proved that JNU videos were tampered to add anti-national voice over to portray a complete different picture of JNU students.

The talented, mostly scholarship-winning higher-studies students re-elected the left leaders in 2017 with even more majority at JNU – in BJP ruling Delhi.

 

In all of above cases, the Sangh Parivar and its media slaves tried to portray the victims as anti-nationals and terrorists.

Where were these cries on India’s integrity when Babari Masjid was demolished?

Was it not a terrorist act, similar to the destruction of Bamiyan Buddhist statues by Taliban?

Why there is no outcry on India’s image when people are routinely murdered in different parts of India accused of eating beef?

Is it any less barbaric than ISIS be-headings?

Why are the JNU students still accused as traitors?

All of these events reveal the horrific, bullying, violent nature of Sangh Parivar.

 

The threatening message is: join us, or be silent – if not, be ready to be silenced.

 

Let’s come back to Pune and Mumbai.

As I said, I do not agree with any violence, anywhere – whether it was committed in Mumbai by Dalits in last 2 days; or against Dalits, “Madrasis” or UP/Bihar migrants by Shiv Sena, MNC and other right wing extremists in last several decades.

It is a fact that BJP and Sangh parivar used the religion/caste card to come to political prominence in India.

They are still using the same card to instigate hatred between Dalits, Muslims and upper castes – to bounce back from their vote-loss in recent Gujrat elections.

Hence the stone-pelting and violence against the Bhima-Koregaon celebrations.

 

The day we stop mixing politics with religion, the better for us.

The quote from 1884 is more valid for present day India:

“Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people”.

£1Bn for a chair, but no money for pencils?

 

Have you read the news about schools not having enough money?

Not enough money to buy “glue, pencils, paper, tape and reading books”?

Per BBC News, the latest plea is from Robert Piggott CofE School in Wargrave, Berkshire.

A school, which is in the Maidenhead constituency represented by Mrs May since 1997.

What a sorry state of schools in constituency of the PM of world’s 5th biggest economy!

This PM had no money issues while agreeing for £1bn DUP-Tory payment – to cement her Prime Ministerial chair.

Chair that is even more wobblier now, is another sad story.

There is only one reason for not allocating enough funds to schools.

It is part of wider, deliberate attempt by this nasty, minority government to destroy UK’s public services.

How could we trust this PM and her gang to conduct Brexit negotiations, if under their rule school’s cannot even afford to buy essential items?

If there is still some dignity left, it’s time for Theresa May to admit failure and leave her post.

Mrs. May owes at least that much to the next generation.

The generation who are in schools, still waiting for their pencils and reading books.